Celebrating the Power of Plants for Conscious Living ~
Visit our New Flagship: 21 East 1st Street, New York, N.Y.
Celebrating the Power of Plants for Conscious Living

Is Kratom the CBD of Opioids?



Like cannabis, Kratom has been helpful in treating drug addiction, has never led to a death from overdose, and, despite that, is considered a dangerous drug with no medical value by the DEA. Despite the fact that studies suggest that kratom is a safer alternative to dangerous pharmaceutical painkillers, the DEA still intends to add kratom to the list of illegal Schedule 1 drugs.

Jahan Marcu PhD writes about why this is yet another bad move by the DEA on Project CBD:

It’s been used traditionally as both a medicine and a textile. It’s reportedly helpful for treating drug addiction, and its consumption has never resulted in a documented death from toxic overdose. But the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) considers it a dangerous drug with no medical value.

Sound familiar?

No, this isn’t about Cannabis. This is about the leaves of a native Southeast Asian tree commonly known as “Kratom.” Its official botanical name is Mitragyna speciosa, and it’s the only natural source of opioid alkaloids other than the poppy plant.

Mitragyna is a small genus in the Rubiaceace family, which includes coffee. Like coffee, Kratom acts as a mild stimulant, an invigorating energy supplement, but only in low doses. At higher doses, it causes a narcotic-like effect and functions as an opiate substitute.

Smoked, chewed or steeped in tea, Kratom has a long history as a folk remedy for diarrhea, muscle pain, fever, coughing, hypertension, fatigue, depression, and other ailments. In modern times it has been used to treat opiate withdrawal, anxiety, chronic pain, and to boost the endurance of manual laborers. Despite its proscribed status in several countries, Kratom is still consumed socially during community gatherings in the Asian tropics.

The unauthorized use of this herb has spread to Western societies in recent years, much to the chagrin of the DEA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials who view Kratom as a threat to public health. On August 25, 2016, the DEA announced its intention to add Kratom to the list of illegal Schedule I drugs. While this designation, for the moment, is temporary, in all likelihood it will become a permanent ban in the months ahead. (A false story on a bogus "Boston Tribune" website claimed that public protests forced the DEA to reverse course and suspend the scheduled ban.)

Read the full article here.